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Tag : sunrise

23 Feb 2017

Sunrise at Juno Pier

One of the nice things about doing art shows in Florida is being able to get out early for sunrise and not freeze. I headed to Juno Pier this morning hoping to get some good clouds at sunrise. I wasn’t disappointed. I had hoped to go at 3 a.m. to catch the Milky Way over the pier but it was cloudy when I got up. I went back to sleep for a couple of hours and by then many of the clouds had cleared away.

The crescent moon was shining bright when I got there before any light was in the sky. As the sky filled with color the became less distinguishable and by the time the sun cleared the horizon, the moon was barely visible.

03 Feb 2017

Birch trees always capture my imagination

My love affair with birch trees continues. There is a fairly large grove about 15 minutes away from my Vermont house and I love wandering around there. It has a magical look to it no matter when I go.

Today I was there before sunrise hoping to get the rising sun shooting through the trees. When the sun came up, it glowed for a couple of minutes and then went behind a large cloud. I could see it would come out again so I tried several shots while waiting to see how the snow, trees and sky would look once the sun was shining again.

As usual, I wasn’t disappointed. The long shadows in the snow and deep blue sky highlighted the white bark and made for beautiful images. There must be 250 trees in the grove and today I noticed a couple of crooked ones shooting skyward. I like the shape they make and worked to get an angle that would highlight them. I’m pretty happy with the shot.

05 Jan 2017

Unexpected sighting while on a Florida beach

I went to a Ft. Meyers beach for sunrise today that is more populated by wildlife than people. There are lots of better beaches for sunbathers, so the only people that come to Bunches Beach are there to either walk, look at birds or photograph birds. Today there was a large group of bird watchers carrying binoculars and scopes, wearing their bird watching clothes and their boots. Which means they were going to mess up a lot of photos.

So I went the other direction on the beach. There weren’t as many birds and no people, but one great blue heron was working the surf to get a fish. Herons are one of my favorite birds to photograph. Their long necks make great shapes, it is either curled back as they relax or it gets taught when they have prey in sight. My heron today was standing in shallow water as small waves rolled in on. It didn’t move a whole lot so I tried lots of different shots, using different composition and placement of the bird in the photos. I decided to try some very slow shutter speed to see if I could get a unique effect blurring the incoming waves.

The heron had caught a good size fish was standing pretty still so I knew it would be sharp and the blurry water surrounded it. Of course, as soon as I make lots of setting changes the heron kind of turned around and a bald eagle came out of nowhere and stole the fish from the heron’s mouth. I was a bit dumbfounded knowing I didn’t have time to change camera settings and fired the camera anyway knowing that anything moving would be a blur even though the eagle was moving fast. I got cool wave effects but the two birds look like blurry blobs. It was fun knowing I was the only person to witness nature at its peak.

05 Jun 2016

Finding something different during Acadia workshop

The IslandDuring my workshop today in Acadia National Park, we were on top of the world, or so it seemed. Cadillac Mountain is the highest coastal peak in the Eastern U.S. and many times during the year it is the first place in the U.S. to see the sunrise. It is quite the panoramic view and during a late morning journey to the top the sun was shining through some clouds and making the water shimmer. A small island seemed so isolated in the water and clouds, so I knew I wanted to capture the feeling of it being all alone. As I was taking the picture in color I was thinking what it might look like in black and white, since the strong backlight on the clouds and water weren’t going to look good in color. But the black and white version emphasizes what I was feeling.

21 May 2016

A surprise visitor appears at birch tree grove

4403-2I was out in a stand of birch trees as the sun came up this morning and thinking about how wonderful it is to be standing in a Vermont forest, hearing only birds chirping and bees buzzing. I was surrounded by beautiful white trees reaching for the blue sky as their leaves as just starting to fully appear.

I have been to this spot many times, the trees look pretty much the same at every visit but the pictures are always different. As the sun was first starting to stream through the trees, I wasn’t seeing any pictures better than what I have shot before. I walking around for about 30 minutes looking for different angles, trying to see something I hadn’t before. With all these trees and beauty, I know there are always unique images to be made.

Finally I got some vision. Things starting falling in line and I shot lots of scenes. None of them excited me as much as Thursday’s birches at the pond, but they were fun pictures. I worked the angles on a large tree with two leaning trees behind it.

As I moved to find another subject, a bright orange flash flew through the air. I was startled by the sudden burst of color and looked to see where it went and what was. A Baltimore oriole landed on a tree nearby. I’m not a birder, but I was a baseball fan as a kid and I recognized the bird from their logo. I watched as the bird flew to another branch, the orange color brightly on display. Another oriole joined it and they flitted around a little and flew away.

I thought about running to the car to get my big telephoto lens so I could get a closer shot of the birds. Then I decided to just enjoy the show and not worry about working for a few minutes. It was quite a show.

07 Oct 2015

Last day of Vermont Fall Foliage Photography Workshop

black and redSeveral years ago I found this great little overlook in Bridgewater, VT, that has an easterly view of layers of hills all the way into New Hampshire. Each time I go there it looks different and I’ve made some beautiful shots from that spot. Today’s sunrise was pretty nice and shooting sunrise and hills can be tricky so I didn’t break out the camera, I just helped my workshoppers get the best pictures they could. And they did great, you can see some of their photos by clicking here.

After the sunrise, we went back into Woodstock to get breakfast and then did some photography at Billings-Marsh Farm, the only U.S. National Park that is a working farm, and then some shots around the village of Woodstock.

At noon it was time to say goodbye to my new friends, which always makes me sad. But it is great to know that I now have more people to visit when I make journeys around the globe.

12 Oct 2014

A fitting end to a photography workshop

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Today was the last day of my second Vermont Fall Foliage Photography Workshop and sunrise made it special. I love when I end a workshop on a high note but we were making so many great photos that we didn’t want it to end. One participant needed to get back to check out of her hotel at 1 p.m. or we probably would still be shooting!

On this photo, I really like how the telephoto lens pulled the distant mountains close and how the fog at sunrise filled the many valleys that can be seen from one of my favorite locations. I go here with nearly every workshop and it looks different every time.

19 Aug 2014

Whale of a sunrise in British Columbia

bc-1060This morning I got up very early since I was still on east coast time. I went down to the beach on Cortes Island in British Columbia well before the sun came up, light was just starting to fill the sky. There were a few clouds to the east and as the sun got closer to coming over the horizon, the clouds caught the sunlight and created spectacular colors. It started with blue and went to red, the pink and finally yellow.

bc-1142Sunrises don’t get better than this, the distant mountains were outlined, the color was special, the bay provided the base and loons, gulls and an occasional seal slapping the water all came together to provide a unique experience.

Later as I was getting ready to take a shower in their fun outdoor shower, I heard a strange blowing noise. Even though I had never heard a whale before, it sure sounded like one to me. I ran back in the house, told my sister what I heard, put on some clothes, grabbed the camera and headed down the hill to the beach. Swimming past were a pod of five Orca whales, their backs bending as they came out of the water and a plume of water flowing into the air. By he time I got set up with my telephoto lens they were pretty far away, but it was exciting to see and hear them swim past.

Click to see my British Columbia photo gallery from the trip.

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09 Mar 2014

Screaming “Good Morning”

The sky was right, so I decided to do a star trail photo at Billings Farm, the national park in Woodstock, VT. Since the moon didn’t set until almost 1 a.m., I made the decision to get up early and shoot the starts before sunrise. Shooting star trails works best when the moon isn’t out, so I thought getting up crazy early was better than staying up crazy late.

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I rolled out of bed at 4 a.m., which sure isn’t natural for me, and I was shooting by 4:15. It was 13 degrees as I traipsed through the deep snow, but it seemed refreshing.

I lined up my shot by cranking up my ISO to around 125,000 and taking a shot. The quality was terrible but I could see my composition as I chimped the photo. I tightened down my tripod and dropped my ISO back down to 1600, my 16mm lens was set to f/2.8 and the shutter speed to 15 seconds. I made sure my “motor drive” was set to continuous and I fired the first shot using a wired shutter remote. After the shot looked good, I shot another one and locked the shutter remote so it would keep firing another shot as soon as the first one was done.

After hearing that the camera had fired several shots, I went back to the Jeep to warm up and wait. After about an hour the sky started to get some light. The black sky slowly began to get dark blue and then a bit brighter. I knew my image was done after about an hour but I let it keep shooting for another 20 minutes just to see what would happen.

I ended up with 117 usable images which I combined in Photoshop to make the final image.

So there I am, it is 5:35 a.m., 14 degrees and the sun isn’t close to coming up yet, so I decided to go to one of my favorite locations and see what the sunrise would look like. It has a nice vista and there is a large open field in the foreground. There is still plenty of snow cover, so I thought would be some good shots.

I was treated to one of the best sunrises I have seen. About 20 minutes before the sun was coming up, the clouds started getting some color. Then I was treated to a colorful light show, blue, yellow, orange and red. It was special. I was shooting like crazy, trying to find the perfect shot.

I got some nice images but more importantly I was treated to a special visual show. It was good that I out not near any other people because I stood out in the snowy field feeling extremely thankful and screaming “GOOD MORNING.”

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16 Aug 2013

Learning about the New London, NH, area

20130816-LEF_128320130816-LEF_1252I have spent a lot of time scouring the backroads of Vermont looking for great photo locations but I haven’t crossed the Conneticut River much to see what is in New Hampshire. After a recent workshop I got an invitation from Mary to show me around the New London area and I took her up on it today. There are several lakes and large ponds in her area and very few near me in Vermont. We started the day a bit after sunrise and caught the mist rising on Little Sunapee Lake, it was a beautiful day and there is plenty to shoot there. We drove around the lake to an esker created by the glaciers that nearly cuts the lake in half. OK, I didn’t know what an esker was either and Mary explained that it is sand and gravel deposited by a river flowing under a melting glacier. It made a nice background and good place photograph Mary on the trail.

20130816-LEF_1383We went to several lakes and ponds and I learned the New England difference between a lake and pond is not the size but the depth. In theory, light can hit the bottom of a pond but not a lake. She then took us to Muster Field Farm, a collection of historic buildings that are preserved on a farm that was where the local militia was mustered and trained, thus the name. By the time we got there, the light wasn’t great, but I was amazed by the boards on a barn, I’ve never seen boards that wide, it took only eight to cover the barn’s side.

19 May 2013

Lots of crabs at Cape May photo workshop

This weekend was my workshop in Cape May. The weather started off great but turned cold and rainy by Saturday night. The group didn’t seem to care as we were out making photos in the rain of the lighthouse after sunset during the blue hour. I always like being out in the rain and shooting and the beacon from the lighthouse looked cool blasting through the rain.

Cape May is famous for birds and Victorian architecture. The shorebirds are late arriving this year, they flock to the Delaware Bay as horse shoe crabs come ashore in May to lay millions of eggs. The crabs were a little late this year too, but they were still there in big numbers. They are an amazing thing to watch and photograph.

It was a great workshop and everybody made some great photos.

26 Jan 2013

Those Vermonters know how to look for the positive

As I was walking out of the South Woodstock (VT) Country Store after chit-chatting with the woman behind the counter, she said “At least it is warmer today.” That’s what I love about the spirit of people in Vermont, it was 14 degrees at noon, and she saw the good side of it. Yes, 14 does feel pretty good compared to the 20-below the night before, but I love being around people who are thinking about the positive side.

Earlier in the day I went past an old barn I had seen the day before. I loved the old doors askew and the little icicles hanging off the roof. When I was there the previous afternoon, the sun was around the side of the barn. I knew it would look better with early morning light hitting the old wood.

15 Sep 2012

It isn’t not a snap dragon, but don’t tell the orchid

I was photographing this morning along the D&R Canal in Griggstown, NJ, with my Meetup group. It is fun going out with other people and taking photos.

During my days as a news photographer, I always noticed that the photographer who got away from the pack and wasn’t standing around chatting with the other photographers was usually the one with the best photos at the end of the day. I’m noticing that with our meetups too. Now some people are there to meet other photographers and get photo tips, which is great. But some are there to make the best photos they can and that person is rarely bunched up with the others.

Today I spent most of the time talking to others, showing them what I was shooting and thinking and answering their questions. I then wandered over to a nice little flower garden and got out my macro lens.

I saw this orchid growing tall above the others, so I moved in and started shooting. I liked my initial shots of one stem isolated against a dark background. I loved the way the rising sun was backlighting the stem and shining through the pedals. I thought I had my shot.

When I looked even closer, there it was: an orchid face! It looks like a dragon coming at me.

01 Sep 2012

Surviving the Mt. Tom death march

I used to be in fairly decent physical shape. It has only been seven years since I did a 30-day bicycle ride from San Francisco to Somerville, NJ. So when Lisa Lacasse asked me if I wanted to do a sunrise shoot from Mt. Tom in Woodstock, Vt. I didn’t think anything about it. I even asked if she wanted to invite her photographer friend Derek MacDonald to join us. The full moon would be setting, so there should be some great photos.

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23 Aug 2012

Special Maine sunrise makes getting up early worth it


I’m not naturally an early morning person, but it is rare that I’m upset when I see the sun rise. Sunday was one of my favorite sunrises ever. I was along Flagstaff Lake in Stratton, Maine, as the sun rose in a clear sky. Fog filled the mountains and hovered over the lake, which was fine by me.

I was on a narrow road that sliced through the water, so every direction I looked was water, mountains and fog. It was one of those times when there was so much to shoot I was running in circles to make sure I didn’t miss anything. I had cameras on two tripods and was firing away like a mad-man, literally screaming joy into the wind.

A couple of photos are posted here, you can see more over on my Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/LorenFisherPhotography.