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Tag : travel

04 Apr 2017

I don’t understand photographers traveling light

I’m glad I wasn’t lazy and I had my tripod with me as I was walking around in Pienza, Italy, after sunset and came across kids with their electronics.

I just read another “pro” blog saying to leave your DSLR camera and lenses at home when traveling and just take a small mirrorless camera with one lens. If the purpose of your trip is to make great images, then that is the most stupid advice there is.

Let me get this straight:

  • You’re going to a grand location.
  • You may never go there again.
  • You want to make great images.
  • You’ve invested a good deal of money for the trip.
  • You’re spending valuable time on the trip.

So you should use equipment that you wouldn’t use at home to photograph your dog?

Yes, I’d rather travel light, it is much easier. I’d rather take no luggage and have everything given to me when I arrive. But that doesn’t happen in my income range. I always have at least one more case of equipment than anyone else – I want to be ready for the shot.

Now if I were to go on vacation and sit on a beach and do nothing, then I don’t need my real camera gear. But that doesn’t happen for me. Even when I’m not on a exclusively photography trip, I get away at least of a couple of mornings for sunrise light so I can make some decent pictures.

I see people buy these light, flimsy tripods for trips and they would never use the skinny things at home. So why use them when you are someplace special? Oh yea, it is easier. I hosted a workshop in Tuscany last summer and a couple of times when we went into quaint medieval villages I didn’t bother taking my tripod. I shoot nearly everything on a tripod but I was feeling lazy. And it showed. When I got home and looked at my images I couldn’t figure out why some days I didn’t get much in the towns. Then it hit me that I wasn’t using the tripod and it changed the way I shot in the towns. I did snapshots instead of real photos because I was just walking around popping off tourist photos without thinking what I really wanted to say with my photos. I blame that on my laziness.

I’m not going to let “It is easier” be the determining factor on whether I get good images. I hope you don’t either.

28 Dec 2015

Feeling grateful for a beautiful 2015

I’m a lucky man.

I have my amazing, loving wife, Robin, who puts up with me and welcomes me back from my travels. I have my health. Those are the only two things that really matter. But on top of that I am fortunate to be able to capture the beauty that I get to witness and share it with others.

This year I hit a milestone by getting to my 50th state, thanks to photographer friend Walter Choroszewski, who helped me finally get to Hawaii. Walter helped me get to Alaska a couple of years ago, the last two states I needed to check off the list. This year I also had trips to Florida, Virginia Beach, Acadia National Park in Maine, the Hamptons on New York’s Long Island, Mystic, CT, Washington, D.C., and finally to California and Joshua Tree National Park. I was able to get away from N.J. and spend some time at our Woodstock, VT., home, but not nearly enough.

There were a loot of great people I met along the way, whether they were attending one of my photo workshops, coming by my art show booth or just great faces that I stopped to photograph. One of my favorites was a large Hawaiian family having a big Mother’s Day picnic on beach in a rather remote cove on the Big Island. They saw me walking past and one them started chatting with me and asked me to take a picture of the group. They had consumed plenty of beer and it took about 30 minutes to corral all of them around the picnic tables. They were a fun bunch.

Selecting my favorite photos of the year wasn’t easy, I kept it to 50 so you don’t get too bored.

2015 was a beautiful year and 2016 looks to be even better.

17 Aug 2014

Visiting my sister in British Columbia

bc-0889My sister Lynda and her husband Bill have built a great house on Cortes Island in British Columbia along the Pacific coast in a group of islands just east of the large Vancouver Island.

bc-0873I took a floatplane from Vancouver and landed at a nearby public dock. The ride was pretty neat, the Dehavilland Beaver, built in the 1950’s, made a couple of stops to drop off passengers at other islands nearby. I was a bit concerned when I got on the plane and the young pilot was wearing shorts and flip flops, but I understood when one of the stops was at a beach in front of the passenger’s house and it didn’t have a dock. The pilot jumped out as we hit the beach and had to wade a little to pull the plane up on the sand.

I sat up front in the co-pilot seat and had headphones that let me hear the air traffic control as crossed waypoints during the hour-long flight. We never got over 1,000 feet, usually around 500 and rarely broke 100 mph. The old engine was loud but she sounded steady and it was a fun ride.

Cortes Island sits in Desolation Sound between the much larger Vancouver Island and the mainland of Canada. It is full of tall ferns that grow up to your waist and was once covered by huge Douglas Fir, Hemlock and cedar trees, but were mostly been cut years ago leaving massive stumps. Second growth has taken over and even they are starting to get harvested. I liked the Alder trees that tend to grow quickly in bare places but they don’t last long, their bark is light colored and has interesting patterns.

bc-1897The locals are proud of their Arbutus trees, which have a smooth, almost skin-color bark and Cortes Island is the northern most reach of their existence. Lynda and Bill tell me that they are called Madrone in Oregon and are considered a weed tree and are cut for firewood.

I can tell already this is going to be a great place for photography during my visit this week.

Click to see my British Columbia photo gallery from the trip.