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Tag : Animals

18 Aug 2019

Another Icelandic journey

We started my latest Iceland Photo Workshop by heading north to the Snæfellsnes Peninsula, a beautiful area that doesn’t get the big bus loads of tourists. It is well known for a cute little church in Budir that is painted black and for Kurkjufellsfoss a scenic waterfall beside the iconic Kirkjufell mountain. We were based near the little town of Grundarfjörður just across a small bay from Kirkjufell. There is an artist in town who goes by the name of Liston and I have visited him with groups several times. He can usually be found outside his studio carving stone and his artwork is all over town. He greets me with a big smile and firm hand shake and is always willing to talk with everyone. I’d love to have one of his large carvings but getting it back home would be a major event. He did offer one of our folks to come stay with her for a couple of months and carve anything she wants! In the winter when it too cold to be outside carving he is in his studio painting. I bought one of his larger acrylic paintings on paper and can’t wait to hang it.

During our two days around Snæfellsnes we journeyed to Bjarnarhöfn, home to a shark musuem but rather than go inside we photographed another black church and the beautiful country side. We also went up to the little harbor town of Stykkishólmur, which is a classic quaint Icelandic village. We made the fairly easy climb up a small mountain that has a great overview of boats in the harbor and the town built on the hills. It is a great view.

Back in Grundarfjörður we wandered out through fields to a pretty waterfalls. It was more than a mile round trip and the last section to get close to the falls was pretty tricky so only a couple of people made the final hike. On the way out an Icelandic horse wandered over to see what we were up to. Before getting too close she stopped and did some posing for all the photographers. And she was a great poser, striking the right moves with a scenic mountain behind her. When she had enough of that she came over to check the camera of one of our people. She sniffed around but didn’t lick the lens!

Click on an image to see a larger version, then you can scroll through them.

18 Aug 2018

Seals and horses welcome us to Iceland

We we blessed to start off my latest Iceland Photography Workshop with great weather. Nice cool summer temperatures and a summer day greeted folks to Iceland. We headed right out from the airport and were shooting old sod roofed houses in Keflavik within 20 minutes. The old houses are really cool and small. The door is less than five feet tall. When I was here in March I shot selfie on my phone in front of one and posted it on Facebook saying my hotel was smaller than I thought it would be. Way too many people thought I was serious.

When then hit the road for a drive up to the Snaefellsjokull Peninsula where we are spending the next two nights. One of many unique things in this country are Icelandic horses. They are a separate breed from any other and the only breed allowed in the country. They are amazingly hardy, they spend the winters outside while cattle are brought indoors for safe keeping. They have beautiful long manes and a heavy coat. Plus they are pretty friendly, whenever I have stopped to photograph them they always walk over to the fence to say hello. The light was great on them today and the background scenery couldn’t be better.

We stopped at Seal Beach, where seals lay around on the rocks and pretty much don’t care how close you get to them. I did have one keep an eye on me but I didn’t get close enough to disturb it. We off to a great start.

24 Jul 2018

Photographing pretty puffins in Iceland

The cutest thing in Iceland and some people think anyplace, are puffins. They are colorful birds about eight inches tall that have a rather sad face. They spend most of their lives at sea and only come ashore in the summer to mate and raise babies. Then they are back to the ocean, floating on the waves for nine months. I took my Iceland workshop group to a location where they nest in the cliff near a very public area.

I hadn’t seen puffins before and didn’t know what to expect, I saw a woman with binoculars so I asked her if she was seeing puffins. She gave me that “you’re a stupid American” look, said “yes” and went back to her bird watching. So much for conversation. I noticed a nearby rock in the grass with some bird poop on it. That’s always a sign of bird activity, many birds poop before taking flight to literally lighten the load. As I stood there I saw a puffin sticking its head out of the grass, but it was too far away to make a good photo. At least I felt good that they were around. Soon I realized the birds that were landing all over the cliff were puffins, but they were still too far away.

I gathered our group and told them to aim their telephoto lenses at the rock, there was going to be activity there. Several birds flew up to the rock and then quickly circled and flew away. They were landing everywhere else but not close to us. I had all of us move back about 10 feet to see if we were crowding them too much and before long a puffin landed near the rock and in range for us. As I was shooting like a maniac I could hear the other cameras firing away but the bird didn’t care. Another one landed and suddenly we were able to shoot two together.

Puffins dive in the ocean and come out with a beak full of small fish that dangle out. One landed with a longer fish than most and seemed to do a happy dance on the rock. It made me pretty happy too.

05 Jan 2017

Unexpected sighting while on a Florida beach

I went to a Ft. Meyers beach for sunrise today that is more populated by wildlife than people. There are lots of better beaches for sunbathers, so the only people that come to Bunches Beach are there to either walk, look at birds or photograph birds. Today there was a large group of bird watchers carrying binoculars and scopes, wearing their bird watching clothes and their boots. Which means they were going to mess up a lot of photos.

So I went the other direction on the beach. There weren’t as many birds and no people, but one great blue heron was working the surf to get a fish. Herons are one of my favorite birds to photograph. Their long necks make great shapes, it is either curled back as they relax or it gets taught when they have prey in sight. My heron today was standing in shallow water as small waves rolled in on. It didn’t move a whole lot so I tried lots of different shots, using different composition and placement of the bird in the photos. I decided to try some very slow shutter speed to see if I could get a unique effect blurring the incoming waves.

The heron had caught a good size fish was standing pretty still so I knew it would be sharp and the blurry water surrounded it. Of course, as soon as I make lots of setting changes the heron kind of turned around and a bald eagle came out of nowhere and stole the fish from the heron’s mouth. I was a bit dumbfounded knowing I didn’t have time to change camera settings and fired the camera anyway knowing that anything moving would be a blur even though the eagle was moving fast. I got cool wave effects but the two birds look like blurry blobs. It was fun knowing I was the only person to witness nature at its peak.

04 Dec 2016

A fun weekend of photographing eagles

c54i5565I took my Meetup.com groups to Conowingo Dam in Darlington, MD, for a fun weekend of photographing bald eagles. The eagles gather at the dam to grab stunned fish that come through the generators. There are eagles that live in the area and many migrate south as it gets colder up north. At one point I counted 89 eagles sitting on the bank across the river and there were many more on an island and our side of the river.

Eagles sit in trees along the bank and then swoop down and grab fish out of the water. Then many times other eagles try to steal the fish and aerial battles ensue.

There are probably more photographers than eagles, it is an amazing the amount of big lenses in use. Canon Pro Services brought a ton of equipment for us to use. A special thanks goes to Tony Kurdzuk of Canon for bringing the equipment and helping our people with their photos. Also thanks to Paul Fishkin who provided us with Benro and Induro tripods and heads.

 

03 Oct 2016

Making quick friends

7746-2As the week goes on the color gets better at my Vermont Fall Foliage Photography Workshop. We hit several of the local hotspots and found some nice color and cool scenes.

We have a great group with two people from California, two from Florida, one from PA, Ohio, NY and CT. It is always fun to watch a group of people who don’t know each other quickly meld together with their common interest of photography.

17 Mar 2015

Ding Darling isn’t done

cormorant with eelThrough the years I’ve read about the great wildlife at the Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge on Sanibel Island near Fort Meyers, FL. You can drive through the refuge and go past several different habitats, but people say after a hurricane a few years ago, it isn’t the same. I’ve only been there twice in the last three years, but it is still pretty cool. I can only imagine what it must have been like before and I hope it comes back to full strength again soon.

But I took my Florida Photography Workshop there and shot some amazing stuff. Cormorants are pretty common but it was fun seeing one pop up from the water with an eel in its mouth and then watch as the cormorant maneuvered the long thing around so it could be swallowed head first. The cormorant flew to a nearby branch and looked like it had some good indigestion after downing the whole thing.

We were just about done when we saw a couple of other photographers stopped so we had to see what was there. It was a yellow crowned night heron in beautiful light and doing great breeding displays. It was my first time seeing one and the beauty of the bird is amazing. It was worth the trip.

See photo gallery from Loren’s Florida photography workshop.

Yellow crowned night heron

17 Mar 2015

Burrowing owls take over Cape Coral

1264There are these cute little owls called burrowing owls that live in Florida and other warm places. Like many species, development has encroached on their territory and their numbers have dwindled. Cape Coral boasts the largest concentration of the little critters and they are trying to protect them as much as they can, or so the say. The owls dig nests in the sandy soil and tend to return to the same place year after year. They don’t particularly like people or pets to get too close, their little heads start bobbing when they get nervous and they head back down their holes. PVC pipes have been constructed around more of the burrows, warning people to stay away. They can be found in parks, in church yards, around government buildings, in yards of homes and since owls are so smart, many are around the library. If someone wants to build on a lot that has a burrow, they can’t just fill it in, they have to get a permit first and then they can fill it in. Government encourages people to build around the burrows, but if you can’t, that’s OK, just kill them off.

See photo gallery from Loren’s Florida photography workshop.

16 Mar 2015

I’m not a birder but I like photographing them

egret reflectionI decided to host a photography workshop in Florida based around photographing birds, not because I get excited seeing birds but because I love the challenge of getting a special shot. A mug shot of a bird bores me. Seeing another photo of a bird sitting on a branch or looking around doesn’t do a thing for me. So I always strive to get something different, something that shows personality, something with composition, something that has more elements than just a bird. And I push that upon all my workshop participants.

line of pelicans

So I was happy today to get some decent shots during the first full day of the workshop. Yesterday afternoon we went to a preserve east of Orlando that was pretty nice. This morning we made the trek west of Orlando to a county park that is well known to birders and photographers and saw lots of different birds. We missed seeing a bobcat by five minutes, another photographer was happy to show us on his camera what we missed. A woman told us about a pond in Lakeland that has lots of friendly birds, like these pelicans, so we stopped there too.

You never know what is around the next corner, which is one of the things that keeps me heading outside.

See a photo gallery from Loren’s Florida photography workshop.

07 Dec 2014

Loving those bald eagles

The Catch

I am continually entranced by seeing bald eagles so today was nearly an overload. I hosted a workshop in Maryland where dozens of eagles nest and migrate. There is a large dam with a hydro-electric plant that is in the perfect location for eagles heading south as waters freeze up north. Of course, this year the north isn’t frozen yet, so there were only about 35 eagles flying around. Usually there is over 100, but I can’t complain about 35.

Eagle Eye LevelThey come to the dam because when it is generating power it sucks fish through the turbines which pulverized them or at least stuns them and thus they are easy targets for the eagles. It is such a thrill to see an eagle circling around and then diving down and grabbing a fish out of the water.

Since I was running the workshop, I didn’t take much time to shoot but I did get a few shots off. The weather was great today, sunny and cool unlike yesterday, which was the first day of the workshop. I did some “light painting” of a nearby lighthouse while the workshop attendees made some cool pictures. Light painting is a fun technique where you can light some pretty large objects with a flashlight while doing a long exposure. It was a cold, rainy night and since I was doing the light painting I didn’t shoot any pictures of the lighthouse. I did take time to get a shot of a nearby pier as darkness was settling in.

Blue Pier

03 Oct 2014

I saw a bald eagle

Eagle over Kent Pond

I’ve photographed dozens of bald eagles, but every time I see one, it is a new thrill for me. Maybe if I moved to Alaska I’d see them everyday and get bored with them, but being on the East Coast, the thrill is there.

During the Vermont Fall Foliage Workshop, we were shooting at a pond and I noticed a big bird flying on the other side. I then saw the white on the head and knew what it was. There aren’t many bald eagles in New England but a fisherman I was chatting with said there was a pair at the pond all summer. I then saw the other one looking like a speck in a tree in the distance.

The eagle was out on a joy ride, circling and soaring overhead for what seemed to be 10 minutes. My neck got stiff from looking up but it was real fun. It didn’t make for the best photo, but it still puts a smile on my face.

22 Aug 2014

A great final day in British Columbia

bc-2154My final day in British Columbia was a special one. We took a five hour ride on the Misty Isles sailboat throughout the islands of Desolation Sound. The highlight came quickly as a humpback whale surfaced about forty feet in front of the boat. A couple of other boats were in the area and we all cut our motors to watch the magnificent beast. The large whale came up several more times and then finally took in a big gulp of air and lifted its tail out of the water. Captain Mike said when the tail comes up they are using their body weight to dive deep and you won’t see them again for a long time.

bc-2140Smoke from distant forest fires created a haze in the surrounding mountains but they still were grand as they rose from the mainland. Captain Mike stopped the boat so everyone could go for a swim, it is a rare place where water is warm enough the swim while snow capped mountains loom nearby. As we were heading back, we saw a harbor seal and her pup sitting on some rocks, they were mighty cute.

bc-2106That night when my sister sister suggested that we go down to the beach I didn’t anticipate that a special life-long memory was going to happen.

There are organisms in the water that have the same glowing stuff as lightning bugs but it is only displayed when the water is stirred. I don’t know what causes bioluminescence, but it sure is cool.

Lynda and I sat there in the complete darkness of a cloudless and moonless night throwing rocks in the water and watching the splashes glow. It was a special time for me to be with my sister, who I don’t see nearly enough, together on a Canadian beach with only two lights visible on all the other islands as the Milky Way and billions of stars shining brightly above. There were, two lucky kids who grew up among the Indiana cornfields, tossing rocks, seeing the water twinkle and talking about how good ours lives are. I’m fortunate to have experienced it and will treasure that memory forever.

I am blessed.

Click to see my British Columbia photo gallery from the trip.

29 Oct 2013

Hippee Halloween dog

halloween_dog13Tonight was the annual Halloween costume contest at The Hungry Hound where dogs put up with their owners desire to make them look funny. Some dogs handle it better than others, wearing a wig and a hat isn’t something that comes natural to many pooches. My favorite of the evening, and the official winner, was Gia, dressed like a funky hippee from the ’60s. Gia was far out and groovy and matched the look of her handlers. She also was good at posing in the studio. There are more photos over on The Hungry Hound’s Facebook page.

21 Apr 2013

I’m just driving along and a bald eagle flies past

Bald eagles have always amazed me. My first encounter was when I was 17 and visiting my sister at her British Columbia island cabin. I had taken her one-person sailboat out into a small harbor and was just floating along when an eagle swooped down and grabbed a fish from the water. I still can envision its talons flexing and then locking into the fish. It seems like it was ten feet away from me, I’m sure that is my memory glorifying the event, but I think of it often.

Today as I was driving from Vermont to New Jersey, heading south on Route 7 just north of Bennington, VT., when a large bald eagle appeared in front of me. Surprise doesn’t quite explain my reaction. You’d think eagles would be fairly common in Vermont, but they’re not. In fact, Vermont was the last state in the U.S. to have a pair of breeding eagles. There are lots more eagles in New Jersey. Go figure.

The eagle was flying low and I watched as it landed in a tree that I had just passed, right along the road. So I quickly became that crazed driver you hate on the highway. I pulled off as an 18-wheeler beared down on me, I did a quick U-turn in front of oncoming traffic and parked about 200 yards from the bird.

I grabbed my camera, put on a 70-200mm lens with a 2X teleconverter and decided to slowly walk toward the perched eagle. Critters seem to know the human shape and eagles are pretty skittish but sometimes they don’t understand what is slowly coming toward them if the shape isn’t really humandoid and it can’t see a face. So I held the camera to my face as I slowly took steps. It took me 10 minutes and my arms were getting tired but without lowering the camera I was able to get within 20 yards of the tree. I’m extremely respectful of space in nature and while I wanted to get closer for a better picture, I didn’t want to disturb the eagle or make it think humans are a threat.

As I’m shooting, I heard another large bird calling to my right. I couldn’t tell what it was but it wasn’t another eagle. It must have been a crow. It did make the eagle anxious and it quickly took off. I grabbed some shots as it flew back around me. I noticed another car had stopped behind mine but the people didn’t get out, I appreciate them respecting what I was doing. The eagle made a circle and looked like it landed deeper in the woods. I waited a few minutes but then resumed my trip with a special smile on my face.

13 Apr 2013

Nasty swan gives friendless goose a chase

A swan nips at a Canada goose while flying around a Cape May pond.

I witnessed one those things in nature today that I doubt if I will ever see again. I went to a state park in Cape May near the lighthouse to see what birds might be around this early in the year. As expected, there wasn’t much activity but I went to a blind on a pond to take a look. I’ve gone to the blind a dozen times before and probably didn’t shoot a frame and I really didn’t expect anything different this time.

As I walked in there were a couple of ducks swimming around and soon a Canada goose landed to my left and went into the tall grass. In a few minutes a mute swan swam in from my right. It paddled right in front of me as I shot away. I noticed the swam wasn’t swimming in a normal, smooth way, it was lunging, like it was doing the breast stroke. The swan headed for the goose and the goose flopped into the pond and starting swimming. The swan headed out toward the goose and quickly caught up. I learned swans swim faster than geese.

The swan got right behind the goose and the goose flew about 30 feet and then landed again. The swan quickly got on the goose’s tail and the goose flew another 30 feet, landing in the pond. The two raced around the five acre pond a few times and then the goose took to the air. As I was watching the goose fly, I heard the swan taking off and I learned that swans fly faster than geese. The swan would get right on the goose’s tail, the goose would dive and the swan would be right back on the goose. They circled the pond, flew up and down as the swan tried biting the goose in midair. Lucky for me they were going right over me and I was ready. I had a 70-200 mm lens with a 2X teleconverter and filled the frame as the swan tried to take a nip of the goose.

The goose landed in the pond and the water chase was on again. Three more times across the pond and they did the aerial chase again. The goose landed in some tall grass and was safe. That was until two other geese landed on the pond and the goose who was getting bullied started honking at them. I was thinking the goose should shut up or the swan was going to know where he was. Well, the goose flies out and lands over by the other two geese. They looked at him and flew off. I don’t know if the goose had BO or was a jerk, but obviously he wasn’t liked by swans or geese. As soon as the two geese left, here comes the swan and the chase is on again.

After nearly an hour, I left and they were still swimming around the pond. When I go back to Cape May for my photo workshop in May, I’ll see if they are still on the chase.